The Non-Stick Oven Mat That Anyone Who’s Ever Roasted a Vegetable or Baked a Cookie Needs

silpat endorsement

Allie Holloway

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Have you ever tried to bake a log? Of course not. It’s a stupidly difficult thing to make. It requires at least five hours of labor and untold amounts of patience to bake a layer of spongy cake that’s thin enough to tightly roll, but strong enough to hold filling. And yet, every month, my friend and I bake one. A Yule log from the Official™ Downton Abbey cookbook started the tradition in December, and most recently, we tackled a lemon log with blackberry compote for May. Every log is a pain in the ass. But every log would have been formidably more painful without a non-stick baking mat.

Our Silpat mat gets almost daily use in my kitchen. Not just for baked logs, but for every single food item we put into our oven. And because everyone else seems to be a few months into their own journey of oven rediscovery—our gas bill can attest to ours—a Silpat mat will likely do you some good, too.

silpat baking mat
Silpat coats its mats with a non-stick material that will not stick. Simple as that.

Allie Holloway

Nothing sticks to them. I’m not kidding.

Nothing, not a damn thing, will lodge itself onto a Silpat mat, unless you burn it to an absolute crisp. Even then, it’ll take one swipe of a dish sponge to loosen it. The mats are constructed from layers of silicon and mesh fiberglass, coated with a finish that’s slightly oily to the touch, but doesn’t leave residue on your fingers. After a hundred cookie bakes, brussels sprouts roasts, and wing reheats, your can of Canola spray will have gathered dust. The roll of tin foil won’t be even a foot shorter. Using a stick of butter to grease a tray will feel downright barbaric.

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silpat baking mat
tkt

Allie Holloway

They’re basically indestructible.

I should back up and explain how you use a Silpat mat. You lay it on top of your baking tray, then fill it with food, then put it all in the oven. There, you’re caught up. One benefit of the mat is that it usually collects all the baking gunk, meaning you won’t have to clean the tray. A point for laziness. Another is that it holds up through hundreds of wipe-downs in the sink or trips through the dishwasher. One time, I accidentally used it as a cutting board; the knife hardly made a mark. A year later, the razor-thin cut hasn’t degraded at all. Three (maybe four? could be five?) years after the mat joined our kitchen, only the darkened color shows its wear.

silpat baking mats
Just two of the different shapes and sizes that Silpat makes.

Allie Holloway

You can pick the one that’ll fit your cooking best.

A French baker first came up with the Silpat mat design in 1965 for better baguettes. To this day, they’re made in France, with certain mat shapes specifically designed for cookies, macarons, and layer cakes. Beyond confections, there are mats sized for the microwave, mats made circular for pizza, and mats for bread. I have the medium-sized, rectangular mat, because it fits our baking tray. It works for cookies, broccoli, potatoes, chicken, and Yule logs. Probably macarons too, if I dared attempt that. Any longer in quarantine, and I might.

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Photography and prop styling by Allie Holloway

Sarah Rense is the Associate Lifestyle Editor at Esquire, where she covers tech, food, drink, home, and more. 

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Source : Esquire