The best wireless chargers for iPhone

At $200, the Base Station Pro costs several times more than most wireless charging pads. The included 30W USB-C power adapter and braided cable are certainly nice touches, and the hefty aluminum frame and leather pad have excellent build quality. But neither of those are reason enough to pay such a steep price.
Rather, the price is meant to be justified by the 18 overlapping coils and custom power delivery hardware and software that allow you to charge three devices at a time, no matter where on the pad you place them.
That’s handy and convenient, but you still can’t charge your Apple Watch on the pad. And no matter how fancy the design or materials, it’s hard to recommend paying $200 for the mild convenience of placing your device anywhere on the charger. Not when a decent charging stand effectively solves that issue as well.
Like the Otto Q charging pad, the Lounge Q stand is “Inspired by Danish furniture.” They’re quite obviously parts of the same line, with dark brushed metal accents and muted grey fabric. It’s industrial, but not cold and harsh-looking. I like the design a lot, and think it would look good on most desks or bedside tables.
Like the Otto Q, the Lounge Q uses a proprietary coil design that Moshi says delivers the fastest wireless charging performance out there. With the right USB-C power adapter (not included) it can wirelessly charge up to 15W, but the iPhone wireless standard tops out at 7.5W.
I don’t know if it’s the fastest you can buy—frankly all wireless charging is slow compared to plugging in. It does deliver a solid charge with multiple iPhones I tested, including those with a pretty substantial case on them. The pad slides up and down on the metal stand, so you can better place the coils to suit your phone. Move it up for a big phone, down for a smaller one, or all the way to the bottom if you want to turn your phone to landscape orientation to watch video while you charge.
The included USB-C charging cable can’t be detached from the charger, which is kind of annoying, but it’s a nice matching grey color and a reasonable four-foot length, though I would prefer it be a little longer.
You’ll need to supply your own USB-C power adapter, though. That’s not necessarily a bad thing, especially if you have a lot of them lying around, but it brings us to the Loungue Q’s biggest drawback: it’s price. $60 is a lot to spend on a wireless charger that doesn’t include a power adapter, despite the excellent design and build quality.
This is a good buy if you can find it on sale. But with so many perfectly good wireless chargers out there, and not enough difference in performance between them, it’s not worth paying a premium for this one.

Logitech’s Powered Pad is a perfectly suitable no-frills wireless charging pad. At $40 it’s not exactly a bargain, but it’s not overpriced, either.
It’s a simple slab that wirelessly charges your iPhone or Android phone (up to 7.5W on iPhones, or 10W on compatible Android phones). I like that there are four matte colors—white, black, blue sage, and lilac—which might help match your decor if you plan to have this is a more open location like your living room.I had no trouble charging my AirPods or iPhone with this, even when I put a relatively thick case on my phone. Your placement doesn’t have to be very precise, though the pad is perhaps smaller than you’d imagine.
The Powered Pad comes with its own power adapter, which attaches to the pad via a barrel connector. That’s understandable on multi-device chargers that need more current, but on a simple single-device pad I prefer some sort of USB plug that could be used for other devices as well.
The $40 asking price is a little on the steep side for a wireless charging pad, especially when the included power adapter can’t be used for your other devices. But this is a quality product that’s easy to recommend if you can find it on sale.
Some multi-device chargers are trying to mimic AirPower with a wink and a nod. AirUnleashed owns it’s AirPower knock-off status. The site proudly proclaims, “By taking the technical design of the AirPower, and radically simplifying it, we managed to make a wireless charging mat that can deliver what Apple originally promised.”
The simple white pill-shaped design and soft-touch finish sure look like AirPower. The box looks like something from Apple, too; clean white with a simple product photo on top and the product name in Helvetica along the side.
But it’s not quite AirPower. There are design compromises, to start. An annoying seam around the edge where the felt-like bottom material meets the sleek top material. It has a permanently-attached charging cable that ends in a USB-A plug, for which you have to supply your own power adapter. It only works with adapters that have an output current of at least 2A at 5V, so you can’t use the adapter that came with your iPhone. The company will happily sell you a Qualcomm Quick Charge 3.0 compatible 18W adapter for $19, or you can use an iPad adapter.
There are feature compromises, too. AirPower promised to let you place any Apple device that can be wirelessly charged at any place. AirUnleashed deliberately simplifies the design by requiring specific placement—phone on the left, watch in a little divot just right of center, and AirPods on the right.
It works, in that it charged my iPhone XS Max, Apple Watch series 4, and second-generation AirPods just fine. But if I have to put my watch in a specific spot, I’d rather have a vertical stand, because laying it flat doesn’t work well with loop-style bands like the Sport Loop or Milanese Loop. And if the power cable is going to be USB, making it permenantly attached seems like a mistake.
This is a reasonable cut-rate facsimile of AirPower, and the $99 price isn’t terrible, but if you aren’t going to have charge-anything-anywhere capability, there are better multi-device chargers that don’t require you to supply your own power adapter.
If you’re not opposed to the big Samsung logo staring up at you from your desk, you could do a lot worse than this inexpensive pad. For less than $30 you get a solid, no-slip pad with a generous size—it’s easy to drop your phone on and start a wireless charging connection without needing to be too fussy about placement.
Best of all, Samsung throws in a 2A micro USB power adapter, so you don’t need to repurpose one of your own or buy a new one. While this is not a “fast charging” wireless pad, it wasn’t really much slower than the fastest chargers we tested; at least, not when charging iPhones. Some Android phones can handle faster wireless charging speeds.
This is one of the uglier charging pads we’ve used, but it’s inexpensive, solid, and works well.
One of the very few wireless charging pads sold at Apple Stores ($59.95), Mophie’s wireless charging base is a quality piece of gear. But I still don’t like it all that much.
It’s a good size, heavy, with a nice rubberized outer coating that prevents slipping. It’s easy to drop your iPhone on it and get a good charging connection without thinking about it. And it supports 7.5W charging, too.
But it has two big strikes against it. First, it’s sixty bucks. You can get good quality wireless charging pads, with adapter, for half that price. Second, the AC adapter connects to a little round DC barrel connector, while most other wireless charging pads use micro USB. Using USB would be far more flexible and convenient—you could plug into dozens of different products, like your laptop, and micro USB cables are everywhere. We have a drawers full of them.
Belkin’s Boost Up shares a lot in common with Mophie’s Wireless Charging Base. Both started off at as Apple Store exclusive. Both are large, with a rubberized non-slip bottom (the Mophie has non-slip coating all over). Both support 7.5W charging on your iPhone, too.
But the Boost Up shares the Mophie’s downsides, too. It costs about $60, nearly double the price of many other wireless chargers. And it includes an AC power adapter that connects to the charger via DC barrel connector rather than micro USB. Again, USB would be far more convenient.
The main difference between the Belkin and the Mophie, then, is your own personal sense of aesthetics. Do you like the matte black rubberized circle of the Mophie base, or do you like the glossy white Belkin, with its reversed slope giving it a sort of “floating” look? It’s really up to you, but we wouldn’t recommend either, based purely on the price and lack of USB connection.
Letscom’s 3-in-1 charger will charge your iPhone, AirPods, and Apple Watch all for the bargain-basement price of about $27 (and it’s often on sale for even less). Too good to be true? Not when you take a closer look!
First, while this does come with a fairly short USB-to-USB-C cable, it does not come with a power adapter. And to get proper charge, you need to plug it into a power adapter that supports the Quick Charge 2.0 or 3.0 standard—you can’t use a basic 5V/1A USB adapter. So you can add that to the cost.
It also doesn’t come with an Apple Watch charger. There’s a special cutout for you to slot in your Apple-made Watch charger, coil up the loose cable, and plug it in to the internal USB-A port.
Once you get that sorted, the charging pad does work well enough. The charging “sweet spot” for the phone and AirPods spots is a little on the small side, but once you set your gear down in the right place, it will charge fine.
This thing is also incredibly cheaply made. It’s lightweight, cheap plastic all the way, with obvious plastic seams and a chintzy plastic door for the Apple Watch compartment.
But it is really inexpensive (if you don’t count the costs of the power adapter and Apple Watch charger you need to supply) and it does work. If you want a 3-in-1 charger on the cheap, here you go.
We’re not entirely sure who this product is for, exactly. It’s a wireless charging pad with an integrated USB cable that tucks away inside. That’s sort of neat and makes it a little more portable, but you still need something to plug the USB plug into. If you’re on the go, you can plug it into your laptop or something like that, but do you really need a wireless charger for that?
The Qimini site proclaims it to be, “The world’s thinnest wireless charger plate to date,” but the Anker Powerport Wireless 10 is definitely thinner. It sells for $59.95, without a power adapter, which easily twice what it’s worth. Oh, and it maxes out at 5W output, so it’s one of the slower wireless chargers out there.
The Qimini Pocket works, and it’s not a bad design, but it’s slow, expensive, and frankly a bit too large to fit in many pockets. We like the idea of an integrated USB cable, but that’s about all we like about this.

Source : Macworld