The World Has a Fertilizer Problem. Bioengineered Corn Could Save Us

Multiple scientists are working to grow corn that can fertilize itself, bypassing the need for nitrogen-based fertilizers that can harm the environment.

Corn-Field

In retrospect, a Wisconsin cornfield in mid-September 2018 wasn’t exactly the best place for an academic seminar. It was hot. There were horseflies. The sun cast a glare on the white poster boards, and the metallic chunk-chunk-chunking of a nearby grain elevator made it difficult at times to hear the main speaker. He was Walter Goldstein, a soft-spoken man in his mid-60s who had invited about 30 researchers and farmers to this field to make a point: Corn could thrive with little to no nitrogen fertilizer. 

“We’re using too much nitrogen,” Goldstein said. “It’s polluting all of our water … It’s polluting the Mississippi. It’s just awful, and yet we need it in order to get the yields.”

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Source : Discovermagazine